3D Printing Cluster Sailing across the Blue Oceans


In 2013, to help traditional and One-TownOne-Product industries upgrade and increase value added, several leading firms began developing and mass-producing consumer 3D printers, facilitating vertical integration and cross-industry applications.

In 2013, to help traditional and One-TownOne-Product industries upgrade and increase value added, several leading firms began developing and mass-producing consumer 3D printers, facilitating vertical integration and cross-industry applications.

The MOEA’s SME cluster project asked 24- year veteran GIT Co. to spearhead a cluster of 27 companies, building a platform to match supply-demand of 3D printing industry. To spur more ideas, GIT organized seminars for medical, aerospace, automobile, and other industries to tap horizontally value-added cases and business opportunities.

The cluster augments the benefits of integration as to channels and applications, via a greater variety of printed products, links between equipment manufacturers and system operators, updated firmware, provided a variety of printable materials, and venues for consumer trial experiences. Incluster partnership helps create more supply channels by putting 3D printed products in the marketplace of cultural & creative industries.

This technology is even used in products of high-value yet in small quantity. Musical instrument maker IF Intl. worked with Road Ahead Technologies to try and make the world’s first 3D printed metallic musical instrument this year. Jewelry designer W&W banded with Astroid to promote 3D digital design and 3D printing tools in Southern Taiwan, in a bid to attract the aspiring young into the field of jewelry metalworking.

To win more orders for the cluster needs service capacity integration and increased application in traditional and industrial sectors. GIT and web hosting service provider Accton Technology Corp. set up an online 3D printing service platform. Next in line will be a 3D printing cloud database that saves the hustle of correcting models back and forth.

GIT Chairman Mr. Daniel Chi likens 3D printing to addition in math. The layer-bylayer production caters to a market of high profit, small quantity, and diversity, with huge bespoke flexibility. This will generate tailwinds for SMEs to sail across blue oceans.

 

文章出處:2015.09spotlight中小企業知識期刊》VOL.07